Français | English

Setting priorities for cancer prevention in Metropolitan France: The proportion of cancers attributable to lifestyle and environmental factors

The aim of this project was to estimate the proportion of new cancer cases attributable to lifestyle and environmental factors in adults in Metropolitan France in 2015.

Funding:
This project was funded by the French Institut national du Cancer (INCa) through grant no. 2015-002.

Final report

The aim of this project was to estimate the proportion of new cancers occurring in adults in Metropolitan France in 2015 that can be attributed to sub-optimal past exposure to various lifestyle and environmental risk factors. Furthermore, the preventable fraction of cancers in France was calculated, to enable the quantification of potential health gains that would be feasible through interventions. In addition, whenever possible the variation in attributable fractions was assessed by socioeconomic status.

Full Report (PDF)

Acknowledgements:

The editors wish to thank the experts and contributors for their valuable participation in preparing this report.

How to cite this report:

IARC (2018). Les cancers attribuables au mode de vie et à l’environnement en France métropolitaine. Lyon: International Agency for Research on Cancer. Available from: http://gco.iarc.fr/resources/paf-france_fr.php, accessed [date].

About

The “Setting priorities for cancer prevention in Metropolitan France: the proportion of cancers attributable to lifestyle and environmental factors” project is the result of collaboration between multidisciplinary teams of French experts: French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety, Centre Léon Bérard, Centre national de référence Papillomavirus, FRANCIM, Hôpital Avicenne, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Inserm, Institut Gustave Roussy (IGR), Institut Pasteur, Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Réseau FRANCIM, Santé Publique France (formerly InVS), Université de Bordeaux, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary University of London (UK), Imperial College London (UK), Recherche sociale et épidémiologique (RSE), Centre de toxicomanie et de santé mentale, Toronto (Canada) and scientists from various scientific Sections at IARC (the Sections of Cancer Surveillance, Nutrition and Metabolism, Infections, Environment and Radiation, Evidence Synthesis and Classification, and Genetics).

Executive summary

List of working groups ; list of collaborators/contributors/observers

Copyright:

© International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), 2018. All rights reserved.

The information, data, publications, documents, and materials (collectively called “Materials”, individually called “Material”) in the various pages of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (“IARC”) websites (hereinafter collectively called the “Site”) are issued by IARC for general distribution. The Materials and Site are protected under the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literature and Artistic works, under other international conventions, and under national laws on copyright and neighbouring rights. Extracts from IARC’s Materials and Site may be reviewed, reproduced, or translated for research, private study, educational or non-commercial purposes with limited circulation.

Reproduction or translation of substantial portions of Materials, reproduction or translation for wider circulation, for commercial purposes, or for any use other than research, private study, or educational purposes require explicit, written permission to be obtained from IARC.

Any use of Materials from the Site should be accompanied by acknowledgment of IARC as the source, citing the uniform resource locator (URL) of the specific Material. Acknowledgement should be placed in such a way that it cannot be construed as IARC’s endorsement, fostering, promotion, or any such association with any commercial, political, or polemical logo, trademark, or brand name. Use of the IARC logo without prior, written authorization is strictly prohibited.

The designations employed and the presentation of the information in this Site do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of IARC concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city, or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Dotted lines on maps represent approximate border lines for which there may not be full agreement.

The mention of specific companies or of certain manufacturers’ products does not imply that they are endorsed, fostered, promoted, or recommended by IARC in preference to others of a similar nature that are not mentioned. Errors and omissions excepted, the names of proprietary products are distinguished by initial capital letters.

IARC does not warrant that the information contained in the Materials or Site is complete and correct and shall not be liable whatsoever for any damages incurred as a result of its use.

Further information can be found in IARC’s Terms of Use and Conditions.

French publications in the Bulletin epidémiologique hebdomadaire:

International publications (in English):

Reference Subject
Cao B, Hill C, Bonaldi C, Léon ME, Menvielle G, Arwidson P, Bray F, Soerjomataram I.
Cancers attributable to tobacco smoking in France in 2015.
European Journal of Public Health, 1–6 doi:10.1093/eurpub/cky077.
Tobacco
Shield K, Marant Micallef C, Hill C, Touvier M, Arwidson P, Bonaldi C, Ferrari P, Bray F, Soerjomataram I.
New cancer cases in France in 2015 attributable to different levels of alcohol consumption.
Addiction. 2017 Aug 22. doi: 10.1111/add.14009. [Epub ahead of print]
Alcohol
Shield KD, Marant Micallef C, Jenab M, Freisling H, Boutron-Ruault MC, Touvier M, Deschamps V, Hill C , Kvaskoff M, Ferrari P, Margaritis I, Bray F, Soerjomataram I.
New cancer cases attributable to diet among adults 30 to 84 years of age in France in 2015.
British Journal of Nutrition (submitted)
Diet
Arnold M, Touillaud M, Dossus L, Freisling H, Bray F, Margaritis I, Deschamps V, Soerjomataram I.
Cancers in France in 2015 attributable to high body mass index.
Cancer Epidemiol. 2017 Nov 18;52:15-19.
Obesity
Shield DK, Marant Micallef C, de Martel C, Heard I, Megraud F, Plummer M, Bray F, Soerjomataram I.
New cancer cases in France in 2015 attributable to infectious agents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Eur J Epidemiol. 2017 Dec 6. doi: 10.1007/s10654-017-0334-z. [Epub ahead of print]
Infections
Marant Micallef C, Shield KD, Vignat J, Baldi I, Charbotel B, Guénel P, Gilg Soit Ilg A, Fervers B, An Olsson A, Rushton L, Hutchings SJ, Bray F, Straif K, Soerjomataram I.
Cancers in France in 2015 attributable to occupational exposures.
(submitted)
Occupational exposures
Marant Micallef C, Shield KD, Baldi I, Charbotel B, Fervers B, Gilg Soit Ilg A, Guénel P, Olsson A, Rushton L, Hutchings SJ, Straif K, Soerjomataram I.
Occupational exposures and cancer: a review of agents and relative risk estimates.
Occup Environ Med Epub [08 May 2018]. doi:10.1136/oemed-2017-104858
Occupational exposures
Arnold, M. , Kvaskoff, M. , Thuret, A. , Guénel, P. , Bray, F. and Soerjomataram, I.
Cutaneous melanoma in France in 2015 attributable to solar ultraviolet radiation and the use of sunbeds.
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. doi:10.1111/jdv.15022
Ultraviolet radiation
Marant Micallef C, Shield KD, Vignat J, Kesminiene A, Cléro E, Hill C, Rogel A, Vacquier B, Bray F, Laurier D, Isabelle Soerjomataram I.
The risk of cancer attributable to diagnostic medical radiation: estimation for France in 2015.
(submitted)
Medical radiation
Ajrouche R, Roudier C, Cléro E, Ielsch G, Gay D, Guillevic J, Marant Micallef C, Vacquier B, LeTertre A, Laurier D.
Quantitative health impact of indoor radon in France.
Radiation & Environmental Biophysics. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00411-018-0741-x
Radiation - radon
Touillaud M, Arnold M, Dossus L, Freisling H, Bray F, Margaritis I, Deschamps V, Soerjomataram I.
Cancers in France in 2015 attributable to insufficient physical activity.
(submitted)
Physical activity
Shield KD, Dossus L, Fournier A, Marant Micallef C, Rinaldi S, Rogel A, Heard I, Pilleron S, Bray F, Soerjomataram I.
The impact of historical breastfeeding practices on the incidence of cancer in France in 2015.
Cancer Causes Control. 2018 Mar;29(3):325-332. doi: 10.1007/s10552-018-1015-2. Epub 2018 Feb 20.
Breastfeeding
Kulhánová I, Morelli X, Le Tertre A, Loomis D, Charbotel B, Medina S, Ormsby JN, Lepeule J, Slama R, Soerjomataram I.
The fraction of lung cancer incidence attributable to fine particulate air pollution in France: Impact of spatial resolution of air pollution models.
(submitted)
Air pollution
Menvielle G, Kulhánová I, Bryère J, Launoy G, Eilstein D, Delpierre C, Soerjomataram I.
Tobacco-attributable burden of cancer according to socioeconomic position in France.
Int J Cancer. 2018 Feb 19. doi: 10.1002/ijc.31328. [Epub ahead of print]
Socioeconomic status
Shield KD, Claire Marant Micallef C, Jenab M, Freisling H, Boutron-Ruault MC, Touvier M, Deschamps V, Kvaskoff M, Hill C, Ferrari P, Margaritis I, Bray F, Soerjomataram I.
New cancer cases in France in 2015 attributable to low levels of serum vitamin D.
(submitted)
Low level of vitamin D
Shield KD, Parkin DM, Whiteman DC, Rehm J, Viallon V, Micallef CM, Vineis P, Rushton L, Bray F, Soerjomataram I.
Population Attributable and Preventable Fractions: Cancer Risk Factor Surveillance, and Cancer Policy Projection.
Curr Epidemiol Rep. 2016 Sep;3(3):201-211.
Methods
Soerjomataram I, Shield K, Marant-Micallef C, Vignat J, Hill C, Rogel A, Menvielle G, Dossus L, Ormsby J-N, Rehm J, Rushton L, Vineis P, Parkin DM, Bray F.
Cancers related to lifestyle and environmental factors in France in 2015.
British Journal of Cancer (submitted)
Summary

Please click on an image to enlarge. To download a figure, please click on the selected format.

Figure 1 : Nombre de nouveaux cas de cancer
et fractions attribuables par facteur de risque



PDF | PNG | PPT | SVG

Figure 2 : Fractions attribuables combinées
par localisation de cancer



PDF | PNG | PPT | SVG

Figure 3 : Nombre de nouveaux cas attribuables pour les dix localisations
les plus fréquentes, par sexe



PDF | PNG | PPT | SVG

FAQ

1. Dans quel contexte ce projet a-t-il été réalisé?

Depuis la dernière étude publiée sur la part des cancers attribuables aux facteurs liés au mode de vie et à l’environnement (2007), de nouveaux facteurs de risque de cancer ont été établis, l’exposition de la population aux facteurs de risque a changé, et de nouvelles données sont parues. Il était donc nécessaire de mettre à jour les estimations précédentes, afin de pouvoir communiquer sur l’impact des facteurs de risque de cancer sur la base d’informations scientifiques mises à jour.

2. Pourquoi estimer le nombre de cas de cancers pouvant être attribués à des facteurs liés au mode de vie ou à l’environnement ?

Estimer le nombre de cas de cancers attribuables à ces facteurs de risque permet d’identifier ceux qui contribuent le plus au nombre de cas de cancers observés aujourd’hui. Des actions de prévention ciblées peuvent ensuite être mises en place pour faire diminuer l’exposition à ces facteurs de risque, et donc le nombre de cancers associé. Ce travail permet aussi d’informer le public sur l’importance relative des facteurs de risque.

3. Qui a réalisé cette étude ?

Cette étude a été financée par l’Institut National du Cancer ; elle a été réalisée et coordonnée par le Centre International de Recherche sur le Cancer (CIRC). En parallèle, plus de 70 experts des principales institutions de recherche ou de santé publique françaises ont été impliqués (liste des contributeurs présentée dans l’annexe 4 du rapport) : ceci a permis d’assurer l’utilisation des meilleures méthodes et données disponibles. Des experts de ce type d’estimation à l’étranger ont également été impliqués pour donner des conseils méthodologiques et apporter leur perspective.

4. Qu’est-ce qu’une fraction attribuable ?

La fraction attribuable à des facteurs de risque représente approximativement la part des cancers qui aurait été évitée si la population n’avait pas été exposée à ces facteurs de risque. En multipliant la fraction attribuable par le nombre de cas de cancers observés dans la population, il est possible de donner un ordre d’idée du nombre de cas qui pourraient être évités en supprimant (ou en modifiant) l’exposition aux facteurs de risque. Dans notre étude par exemple, si personne ne fumait, 20% des cancers (soit plus de 68 000 cas) observés en 2015 ne seraient pas apparus.

5. Qu’est-ce qu’un facteur de risque de cancer?

Un facteur de risque de cancer est tout attribut, caractéristique ou exposition d’un sujet qui augmente la probabilité de développer un cancer (par exemple, fumer ou boire des boissons alcoolisées sont des facteurs de risque de cancer). Certains facteurs, à l’inverse, font diminuer la probabilité de développer un cancer : il s’agit des facteurs dits protecteurs (par exemple, consommer suffisamment de fruits et de légumes, ou ne pas être en surpoids, sont des facteurs protecteurs).
Dans cette étude, nous nous sommes intéressés aux facteurs de risque et facteurs protecteurs liés au mode de vie et à l’environnement (voir ci-dessous). Nous n’avons en revanche pas inclus les facteurs héréditaires.

6. Qu’appelle-t-on facteurs liés au « mode de vie » ?

Les facteurs liés au « mode de vie » sont l’ensemble des facteurs de risque de cancer liés au comportement individuel (qui peuvent être modifiés par des choix personnels) : la consommation de tabac, d’alcool, l’alimentation, l’activité physique, l’exposition aux cabines UV, sont des facteurs liés au mode de vie.

7. Qu’appelle-t-on facteurs liés à l’« environnement » ?

Dans notre étude, les facteurs liés à l’« environnement » sont l’ensemble des facteurs auxquels la population est exposée via différents milieux (air, eau, sols, etc…) : les agents infectieux, la pollution de l’air, les expositions professionnelles ou les substances chimiques de l’environnement par exemple, sont considérés comme des facteurs environnementaux.

8. Comment les facteurs de risque étudiés ont-ils été sélectionnés ?

Les facteurs de risque étudiés ont été sélectionnés si leur cancérogénicité chez l’être humain était scientifiquement établie, c’est-à-dire s’ils étaient classés cancérogènes ou probablement cancérogènes par le CIRC. De plus, des données d’exposition représentatives de la population française devaient être disponibles pour chaque facteur de risque étudié. Ainsi par exemple, la contribution de l’exposition de la population générale aux pesticides au risque de cancer n’a pas pu être estimée, car aucune donnée d’exposition aux pesticides représentative n’existe à ce jour pour la population générale. Enfin, seuls les facteurs de risque modifiables ont été pris en compte.

9. Comment sont calculés les chiffres présentés ?

Les chiffres présentés sont basés sur trois principaux types de données : la proportion de la population française exposée à chaque facteur de risque (par exemple, pourcentage de fumeurs), la quantification du risque de cancer associé à chaque facteur de risque (par exemple, à combien s’élève le risque de cancer chez un fumeur comparé à celui d’un non-fumeur), et enfin le nombre de cancers observés en France en 2015 chez les personnes âgées de 30 ans ou plus.

10. Quelle est la différence entre les chiffres présentés dans ce rapport, et ceux présentés en 2007 par le CIRC ?

Les chiffres de la présente étude utilisent des données d’exposition et de risque mises à jour (dernières données disponibles). Les estimations qui ont été faites ici portent sur le nombre de cas de cancers observés en 2015 (estimé à partir des données des registres de cancer FRANCIM), alors qu’il s’agissait des chiffres pour l’année 2000 dans l’étude précédente. Enfin, les chiffres présentés ici prennent en compte un plus grand nombre de facteurs de risque : par exemple, l’alimentation et de nombreuses expositions professionnelles (gaz d’échappement diesel, par exemple) inclues ici ne l’avaient pas été en 2007. Par ailleurs, pour la présente étude, le CIRC a travaillé en collaboration avec l’ensemble des agences sanitaires et de recherche françaises, ce qui n’était pas le cas pour l’étude précédente.

11. Au total, combien de cas de cancers peut-on attribuer à des facteurs liés au mode de vie ou à l’environnement ?

Chez les adultes de 30 ans et plus en France en 2015, on estime que 41% des cancers, soit environ 142 000 cas pourraient être évités si l’exposition de la population française aux facteurs liés au mode de vie et à l’environnement était optimale. Une exposition optimale correspond à une exposition nulle pour les facteurs de risque qui peuvent être évités (comme le tabac ou l’alcool), ou à une exposition limitée pour les autres, comme l’exposition au rayonnement UV par exemple.

12. Quels sont les facteurs de risque de cancer les plus importants en France ?

Les premières causes de cancer en France sont les consommations de tabac et d’alcool, respectivement responsables de 20% et 8% des cancers. Viennent ensuite l’alimentation (consommation insuffisante de de fruits, légumes, fibres, produits laitiers, et consommation de viande rouge et charcuterie) (5,4%), le surpoids et l’obésité (5,4%), puis les agents infectieux (4%), les expositions professionnelles (3,6%) et les rayonnements ultraviolets (rayonnement solaire et cabines UV) (3%).

13. Pourquoi la contribution de certains facteurs de risque est-elle si importante, alors que les niveaux d’exposition à certains facteurs de risque sont actuellement en diminution (tabagisme, exposition à l’amiante,…) ?

Pour la majorité des facteurs de risque, une période de latence de 10 ans minimum a été prise en compte entre l’estimation des expositions et la survenue des cancers observés pour tenir compte du délai d’apparition de la maladie après l’exposition à risque. C’est pourquoi des expositions passées peuvent encore avoir un impact aujourd’hui. C’est le cas par exemple des expositions professionnelles (exposition à des cancérogènes en milieu professionnel) : l’exposition à l’amiante, bien qu’interdite depuis 1997, a encore un impact majeur dans l’apparition de cas de cancers en 2015 ; c’est aussi la raison pour laquelle le tabac demeure la première cause de cancer en France, malgré la récente diminution de la consommation de tabac.

14. Pourquoi y a-t-il si peu de cas de cancers attribuables à l’exposition à des substances chimiques (pesticides, perturbateurs endocriniens) ?

Nous avons tenté d’estimer la part de cancers attribuables aux substances chimiques cancérogènes présentes dans l’environnement général (les pesticides en sont un exemple). Pour la majorité de ces substances, aucune donnée d’exposition représentative et/ou aucune donnée de quantification du risque n’était disponible pour la population générale, ce qui rendait l’estimation impossible. Ce constat permet de souligner le besoin de davantage de données d’exposition et de quantification du risque correspondant.

15. Quelles sont les autres causes de cancers ?

Nos résultats montrent que 41% des cancers pourraient être évités par la réduction de l’exposition de la population aux facteurs de risque étudiés. La part de cancers restante peut s’expliquer par des facteurs de risque qui n’ont pas été inclus dans l’analyse, faute de données disponibles (données d’exposition ou cancérogénicité non établie chez l’être humain), parce qu’ils sont non modifiables (nombre d’enfants, par exemple), ou encore par des facteurs de risque héréditaires, ou encore inconnus à ce jour.